Why Sitting is bad for you

Why Sitting is bad for you

Described by the scientific community as “the new smoking,” sitting is killing us. The negative effects of sedentary behaviour by office workers and television enthusiasts alike has led to a revolution in the home and office. People are starting to stand up for their health. Sitting is bad for you. There can be no doubt. Let's take a look at why and what we can do about it. Negative health effects of sitting It seems as if every day brings more evidence that sitting too much is bad for our health. “Stand Up Australia,” a study which analyzed the activity level of office professionals, determined that almost 80 percent of their work day is sedentary. Prolonged physical inactivity can lead to obesity, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, Alzheimer’s disease, depression, and colon, endometrial, and lung cancer. Guess what this means, folks? Sedentary (lack of) behaviour has a direct, positive correlation with four of the top ten leading causes of death reported by the World Health Organization (WHO). Importantly, the research is telling scientists that sitting too much, in itself (regardless of exercise habits), is a health risk. So the poor office worker who faithfully gets in his recommended 30 minutes a day is still at increased risk for all of those deadly effects of inactivity. Simply heading to the gym after work for an hour's long workout will not really make a dent in the damage done over years of sitting all day. Think about it! Most people sit at work, but arrive and leave in their car. That's already 8-10 hours of sitting per day. Add to this the television...
10 tips for comfort and productivity while standing

10 tips for comfort and productivity while standing

Pay attention to your posture. Bad posture will cause you issues whether you’re sitting or on your feet. Your ears, hips, and knees should all be in line. If your hips are too far forward or back your spine is in a less than optimal position. Posture affects everything from the health of your spine to how people perceive you. Try to unlock your knees to remove strain. If you can stand with a slight bend in the knees for small periods of time this will help improve flexibility, strength in the quads, and promote joint health. An adjustable surface for working from will help with changing the height incrementally, thus varying the angles that your arms, back and neck are in. Try standing on a block, using an inclined surface, or a massage ball under the feet to vary the level. Get an anti-fatigue mat to take the load off your feet Walk around occasionally to loosen up the legs. This will be much easier to do regularly as you’re already on your feet. If possible, try squatting down a couple of times to loosen the lower back and put the legs into a different position. Squatting and sitting are two very different movements. Squatting is a natural human position. Sitting is definitely not. Do yoga regularly to strengthen your core and to maintain good posture, which in turn will make standing less tiring. Try to plan meetings at your desk and only make one chair available so everyone will have to stand. Sit for lunch and sit for breaks but otherwise, try to plan your day around...
Productivity Hacks – 10 tips to be healthier, more efficient, and more alert at work

Productivity Hacks – 10 tips to be healthier, more efficient, and more alert at work

1.    Cultivate a routine of regular stretching. Morning stretches are great for waking the body up but if you don’t have time or you already worked out in the morning, try to stretch at lunchtime. Ideally, this should be done before lunch but could also be done 30 minutes afterwards. The act of stretching will ‘reset’ the spine, open the lungs, pump blood into all the muscle-groups and ultimately help prevent the after-lunch slump so many of us experience. Stretches can be as simple as raising the arms while trying to touch the ceiling, touching your toes, rolling the shoulders back and hugging the arms behind the back. 2.    If you work in a noisy environment and music is too distracting to work to try Noisli, an excellent web and mobile app. Noisli is a background sound and noise generator. If you work better to the sound of birds chirping while water flows through a windy meadow then this is the app for you. Random white noise can be generated as well as coffee shop sounds. The web version is free and the app costs a couple of dollars. 3.    Give up the coffee and try Matcha Tea. Matcha is a cancer-fighting, fat-burning super drink that delivers caffeine in a more steady release fashion. Coffee tends to give us a jolt and then bring us back to earth with a thud. Matcha tea gives a milder buzz for a longer period of time. Matcha is packed with antioxidants and doesn’t raise insulin levels, thus helping keep cravings and blood sugar under control.  We got ours from Le Palais de Thés...